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Project Focus Area – Health

During the past decade, health has achieved unprecedented prominence as a key driver of socioeconomic progress, and more resources than ever are being invested in health. Yet poverty continues to contribute to poor health, and poor health anchors large populations in poverty. Health development is directed by the ethical principle of equity: Access to life-saving or health-promoting interventions should not be denied for unfair reasons, including those with economic or social roots.
-WHO 2010

“We will not be successful in our efforts to end deaths from AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis unless we do more to improve health systems around the world, focus our efforts on child and maternal health, and ensure that best practices drive the funding for these programs.”
– President Barack Obama, May 5, 2009

Worldwide, around 2,000 children perish every day due to unhygienic sanitation and unclean water. Around half a million people die every year from malaria – mostly children and pregnant women. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that in urban areas in the Global South, asthma is increasing on average 50% every ten years. TB claims two million lives annually. Compounding these crises, currently 85% of the world’s population is being priced out of the health industry’s market and denied the coverage they need to survive (Oxfam). Privatization of health-care systems further reduces health-care availability (WHO 2010). Promoting and protecting health is essential to the welfare of all communities and directly correlates with sustainable economic and social development.

World health experts have worked together to fight global outbreaks, malaria, respiratory illnesses, polio, and other epidemics. By adequately funding programs with specific health targets, the health and well-being for millions will improve (Global Health Initiative 2009). Comprehensive approaches to community health efforts get families the help they need. Because FCDE partner organizations are embedded in the community, they can directly promote positive health practices and prevention strategies. FCDE's Isla interns, donors, and partners are at the forefront of making a profound difference in local health advancement.